Author Archives: carrite

Almost Started (17-20)

• July 1 is here — the deadline I set for myself several months ago for completion of the first phase of the first volume of the 4 book Eugene V. Debs Selected Works project. I began the week with … Continue reading

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Finish Strong (17-19)

• I don’t have anything either profound or whimsical to impart this week. There really has been no time for essay writing — I was pushing really hard to get the backlog of pdfs of Debs articles to be processed down … Continue reading

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Poetry and Bible verses (17-18)

•  In an effort to avoid having to spend several weeks at a very dreary task, I have been writing brief biographical footnotes for Debs Volume 1 as I go — it’s a pretty painless way to break up the … Continue reading

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Goldbugs and Silverites (17-17)

• Few things are harder for contemporary Americans to understand about the 1890s than the grand debate over monetary policy. Many people have heard the phrase “Free Silver,” few people know what it means. Goldbugs? Silverites? Monometallism versus Bimetallism? Eyes glaze … Continue reading

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Debs as a radical Christian (17-16)

• I am pleased to note that I have located what may well be the first truly serious piece of Debs scholarship published in the current century. David Burns, a history graduate of Northern Illinois University, adapted his dissertation to become the book The Life … Continue reading

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Poles, Huns, and Dagoes (17-15)

• I was going to write a little bit about the bloody 1892 Homestead strike this week since I’m moving into 1892 with the Debs Locomotive Firemen’s Magazine material and have been reading an 1893 account of the conflict written by a close observer. However, … Continue reading

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The Gilded Age (17-14)

• I was a pretty terrible student in high school. I got good grades in most of my classes but didn’t exert myself in the least, didn’t know how to properly study, and didn’t really know how to read a nonfiction … Continue reading

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